Markets and Strategies II (1318) 25-06-17 06:31

Markets and Strategies II

Spring Semester 2009

Markets and STRATEGIES II

 

SIZE:                           Laboratory Course, 4+2 hrs.

                                    11 ECTS

FIRST CLASS:             Monday, Feb 16, 2009

 

TIME:                           Monday, 3.30 – 7.00 p.m.

LOCATION:                 L7,  3-5, Room P 044

                                              

OFFICE HOURS:         Peitz: Wednesday 11.00 a.m. – 12.00 p.m.

                                    (upon prior appointment)                                                   

                                    Stahl: Monday 2.00 – 3.00 p.m.

                                    (upon prior appointment)

                                    Appointments under 181-1880                                             

ADRESSEES:

The course is

 

PREREQUISITES:

Diploma students: Microeconomics I – III or equivalent, M&S I or equivalent

Doctoral Students: Microeconomics I – II or equivalent, M&S I or equivalent

 

GRADES:

The grade for the course is based on active participation in class (50%) and the presentation of solutions to the case problems presented below, in form of four team papers (50 %).

 

CONCEPT OF THE COURSE SEQUENCE:

The course sequence consists of three blocks. M&S I, a four hour lecture course (plus 2 hr. Lab) held in the Fall Semester; Seminar on M&S I, a block seminar held at the beginning of the Spring Semester; and the present interactive four+two hour case study course held in the Spring Semester. Participation in both the seminar and the case study course necessitates participation in the Fall Semester course (or equivalent). Participation in the seminar is recommended, but not required for participation in the Spring Semester course.

The philosophy that has led to the course sequence is as follows: The analysis of a real life strategic planning problem necessitates the reduction of the problem to its essentials. The Fall Semester course is designed to equip the student with the tools relevant for the analysis of such strategic problems at the level of the firm, as well as the level of an industry. Depending on the industry structure, both are prerequisites for the analysis of regulatory and competition policy.

Emphasis is placed not only on the capability to read the literature on existing models, but also on the generation of new ones that are appropriate for the analysis of specific real life problems. In contrast to the presentation of recipes, the Fall Semester course is designed to equip the student with micro theoretic and game theoretic tools to attack strategic problems.

In the present Case Study course the student is challenged with the development of new modelling approaches. Towards this, we present a sequence of four cases from different industries. We will form teams of students. The teams will compete against each other in developing answers to two strategic questions raised at the end of each case presentation. The first question will involve a decision problem for a key industrialist in the relevant industry; and the second one a regulatory or competition policy decision problem for that industry. There will be coaching sessions for each case in which the instructors will advise the teams towards the development of constructive models towards these answers.

We will form teams of students. The teams will compete against each other in developing answers to two strategic questions raised at the end of each case presentation. The first question will involve a decision problem for a key industrialist in the relevant industry; and the second one a regulatory or competition policy decision problem for that industry. There will be regular coaching sessions in which the instructors will advise the teams towards the development of constructive models towards these answers.

Students are allocated to teams randomly for cases 1+2, and again for cases 3+4. Coaching sessions may be held outside the scheduled hours. Konrad Stahl will be in charge of Cases 1 and 2, Martin Peitz of Cases 3 and 4. The course will be held in English language.

 

LITERATURE:

The main reference texts for the course will be

 

We will assign additional material especially to doctoral students.

 

SESSIONS:

Date

Subject

Feb 16

Introduction: From case material to models

           

Feb 23

Introduction to Case 1: Automotive Sales: Vertical Restraints in the Automotive Distribution Sector

March 2

Coaching Sessions Case 1

March 9

Introduction to Case 2: Advertising in the Internet: The Google-DoubleClick Acquisition

March 16

Student Team Presentations Case 1

March 23

Coaching Sessions Case 2

March 30

Student Team Presentations Case 2

April 6

Easter Break

April 13

Easter Break

April 20

Introduction to Case 3: Reaction to Generics in the Pharmaceutical Industry

April 27

Coaching Sessions Case 3

May 4

Introduction to Case 4: Vertical Restraints in the Publishing Industry

May 11

Student Team Presentations Case 3

May 18

Coaching Sessions Case 4

May 25

Student Team Presentations Case 4